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The fight for what’s right: students use their voices to advocate for women’s rights

On+Jan.+19+2019%2C+sophomore+Jessica+Dorrien+with+her+family+and+friend%E2%80%99s+attended+The+Women%E2%80%99s+March+in+Washington+D.C.+to+advocate+for+women%E2%80%99s+rights.
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The fight for what’s right: students use their voices to advocate for women’s rights

On Jan. 19 2019, sophomore Jessica Dorrien with her family and friend’s attended The Women’s March in Washington D.C. to advocate for women’s rights.

On Jan. 19 2019, sophomore Jessica Dorrien with her family and friend’s attended The Women’s March in Washington D.C. to advocate for women’s rights.

On Jan. 19 2019, sophomore Jessica Dorrien with her family and friend’s attended The Women’s March in Washington D.C. to advocate for women’s rights.

On Jan. 19 2019, sophomore Jessica Dorrien with her family and friend’s attended The Women’s March in Washington D.C. to advocate for women’s rights.

Grace Beneke, Lifestyles Editor

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In 1987, Jimmy Carter declared the month of March as International Women’s History Month, and there is a Presidential Proclamation which honors the remarkable achievements of American Women. Whether it is being aware of these issues or actively participating to make a change in the issue at hand, Trinity students have participated in several activities relating the these ideas.

Junior Ashley Mason uses forensics as her medium to advocate for women’s rights. Mason prefers to pick speech topics on sexist issues in society today. Whether it is about doctor’s unconscious bias against women’s pain or the incarceration of women who defended themselves from domestic violence, Mason wants to educate and inform others on these issues.

“Forensics is my platform because I am reaching people all over the country just by showing up to tournaments on the weekend, so advocating that way spreads my message,” Mason said.

After discussing the importance of treating waitresses with respect, another team member suggested to Mason that she should research it for a speech topic. This year, Mason wrote a speech about sexual harassment in the service industry. Servers are reliant on tips for income, so sometimes they don’t tell their customers to stop in fear of risking their tips.

“The best comment I ever received was a woman who wrote a comment on my ballot that thanked me for talking about the topic of sexual harassment in the service industry,” Mason said. “She said, ‘I was that waitress. I was the bartender. Thank you for telling our story.’ That made me cry because that’s the reason why I do it. I want to be an advocate for the community and that’s why I do forensics.”

Mason’s role model is Michelle Obama due to her outstanding leadership qualities and dedication to important topics.

“She is a strong woman and shows everyone that you can do anything you want,” Mason said. “She shares an important lesson by speaking out about things she believes in and that’s what I want to do.”

“If we talk about women’s rights then we are getting closer to equality which should be every society’s goal,” Mason said.

On Jan. 21 2017, the day after Donald Trump’s inauguration, protesters in cities across the world, with the most prominent march in Washington D.C., engaged in protesting Trump’s policies and lewd behavior towards women. This day marked the beginning of an annual tradition of women’s marches in big cities to raise awareness for issues surrounding women’s rights in society.

This year, sophomore Jessica Dorrien, along with her family and sister’s friends, went to the Women’s March in DC over the Martin Luther King weekend.

“It is something my family believes in, so my mom, sister, Alyssa, grandma and [I] all went,” Dorrien said. “I also went with my sister’s friends, Cate Williams, Alaina Musselwhite and Mrs. Musselwhite.”

The issues that are important in today’s society and politics, were brought up by speakers, written on signs and were chanted during the march.

“It was a really fun to make signs and see other peoples advocating for different things,” Dorrien said. “I think that everything happening in politics today is important, especially with the #MeToo movement. I think that some people in politics have said and done things that are not okay and our country shouldn’t be represented like that. People should be held accountable for what they say and do and that isn’t happening. These movements need to be listened to and changes must be done about them.”

Women’s rights issues are important to Dorrien because she is inspired by her grandmother’s ability to succeed in a male dominated work place.

“My grandma is my personal role model because she went to college and became a vice president at Disney in a very male-dominated time,” Dorrien said.

Junior Kaitlyn Borck likes to watch videos of women’s rights speakers and engage in conversation about various women’s rights issues.

Borck’s definition of feminism is the equality for both genders. She believes extreme feminists stray from the original idea of feminism, as they see feminism from the perspective of as women are superior and that the future is female.

“Now especially, the modern feminist movement is happening and I think people need to check their beliefs in relation to feminism,” Borck said. “Now, everyone must fight for equality where no gender is idolized and everyone is given the same opportunities. Each day someone is denied the ability to do or have something because they are female and seen as inferior. However, times are quickly changing, and strong, powerful women are in the limelight. … I think, in general, all women deserve recognition for their accomplishments and contributions to all aspects of life.”

A role model to Borck is her mother, who shows her strength and compassion every day.

“My mom always put other people first regardless of who they are and happily guides them where they need to be,” Borck said.

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About the Writer
Grace Beneke, Lifestyle's Editor

Grace Beneke is a junior and entering her third year on The Trinity Voice staff as Lifestyles Editor. When she isn’t writing articles, you can find her...

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The fight for what’s right: students use their voices to advocate for women’s rights